Great Drying Weather

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Pine trees along Raymond's Gut

Pine trees along Raymond’s Gut

It has been over thirty-two years since I cut a field of hay. Even now when a great stretch of perfect drying weather hits, I have the itch to knock down a field of grass and start making hay. The smell of grass turning into hay is something you never forget.

It turns out the same kind of weather is very effective for drying out our over-saturated ground. After the rain that devastated South Carolina and drenched Eastern North Carolina, some great drying weather is very welcome even if I have no hay to make.

We had a wet summer but the rain came in such intense short bursts that we also had a very nice summer for finding your own beach. Such was not the case with our early October storm. It stole our blue skies and hid the sun from us for a few days.

Our yards were too wet to walk on much less mow. Farmers’ crops were stuck in the fields and everything that could hold water was full of it. High water was everywhere.

Then the weather completely turned around. The skies cleared, the sun came out, and the wind started blowing. The relative humidity dropped and things started drying out. We even had a good dose of Indian summer before we got a shot of Canadian cold air across our bow.

As hard as it is to believe I had to water our green beans and tomatoes on October 20. Yes, fall gardening can very successful here. This year we are expecting to harvest some green beans in early November and with a little luck we might also have some Umberto tomatoes not long after that.

That is life on the Crystal Coast, we can have weeks of great weather then some bad weather and before we know it we are back into the fantastic weather.

Even during the amazing rain event that almost washed away South Carolina, we got a break. Saturday, October 3, was a beautiful day here. I went kayaking in the high water and my neighbor went fishing in his skiff. I kayaked in places that are impossible to reach during most of the year. Someone just a few days earlier had asked me about a lot that is for sale nearby.

It is a large river front lot and I often walk on the marsh edge of it during the winter. I told the people looking at it to make certain that they checked it out during high water. Sure enough that Saturday with all the high water and our flooded inlet, I was two thirds of the way up in the lot in my kayak.

In the end the high water receded, our tides became normal and we got the great fall weather that is often the norm here on the Crystal Coast. Now we have not seen in rain in over two weeks and there is no in forecast for the next week.

The waters have cleared and there was even a flounder blitz at the pier this week. The story is that over 40 keepers were caught in one morning and one weighed in at nearly six pounds.

I cannot claim any success like that, but I did get a two pound flounder not long ago and I expect to soon be out in the kayak chasing drum and flounder. Great weather like this should be bottled and brought out in February when we really need it.

The picture in the linked post looks great but I took an even better one on October 20, 2015. Great weather in the fall is a tradition that seems to be well entrenched on the Crystal Coast.

There is more information about our summer at my SOBX Coastal Paradise site.

Our most recent email newsletter about our beach area went out Friday, September 4, and can be seen at this link. Our next email newsletter should be out before the end of October.

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Sometimes the Good Weather Runs Out

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On the Beach Between Showers

On the Beach Between Showers

Weather is a funny thing. Sometimes it helps you enjoy a place and other times you lose interest in a place because of the not so nice weather.

We had a lot of rain in the summer of 2015. At our dock three miles up the White Oak River I recorded 27.4 inches in June, July and August.

In spite of all the rain, everyone I talked to enjoyed the summer weather. It was warm at times and there was some wet weather, but there was no stretch of depressing weather. It was a good summer with lots of great memories.

I had walks on the beach, kayak trips, and some rides down the river in my skiff. September started out warm, but by the middle of the month, the weather was great and I offer up this album of pictures as proof. I was expecting more great weather on the Crystal Coast.

Then our luck ran out, wet weather descended on us for the last week of September and the first first few days of October. In just a short time we picked up another ten plus inches of rain. When I checked our rain gauge at 5 PM on October 2, our running total from June 1 went up to 37.4 inches.  It rained another six tenths of an inch after dark on October 2. Thirty eight inches is a lot of in the space of four months and two days but it could have worse. Areas like Morehead City and points east of us got over 15 inches of rain this last week compared to our six inches.

Our outdoors fun during this last week of September and first week of October has been interrupted by rain and you just have make the best of it.  The rain has not been one of those nice summer rainstorms that come at night and leave the morning sand on the beach dimpled and crusty from the moisture. At times it has been rain that keeps you inside and makes you wonder when and if the sun is coming back out.  The good news is the sun is back out on the Crystal Coast on Saturday morning, October 3.  However, our neighbors in South Carolina are struggling through a historic once in a thousand years rainfall event that is coming on top of a dry summer in the interior of the state.

I often defend rain because I enjoy sitting back on the porch and watching a needed rain. There is nothing like rain water to quench the thirst of all the plants and our area needs rain because Carteret and its neighboring counties are a big agricultural area.  You can grow corn and soybeans without regular rain. However, I cannot say anything in defense of 38 inches of rain in four months. Only a drought stricken area like California needs that much rain.

Our fall home vegetable crops are having a hard time growing and the farmers are having a hard time harvesting peanuts and corn because the fields are too wet for equipment.

Except for the last couple of days of nearly steady rain, it is still possible to enjoy the beach. I took the post picture between showers at one of the local beaches. I posted several more on my photo stream on Flickr.

While we might complain about rain, we are all very happy that Hurricane Joaquin decided to bypass us. The rain might get us wet but it is nothing like being in a hurricane like Irene.  We will dry out from the rain and even from the rain that comes back for Sunday and Monday.

Coastal weather is a great riddle and we have lots of fun trying to figure it out.  Right now I cannot wait until Tuesday of next week which mostly sunny after this streak of wet weather.  It is time to go fishing and  I am overjoyed at that.

Our most recent email newsletter about our beach area went out Friday, September 4, and can be seen at this link. Our next email newsletter should be out early in October.

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Cue The Great Weather

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Swansboro Harbor

Swansboro Harbor

We are just past the middle of September and already the worst of the heat of summer has disappeared. We have recently enjoyed some of the nicest weather since spring and the beach has been stunning.

However, coastal weather is tricky and even great weather can be a tease. We had a few perfect days early in the week of September 14. We took advantage of the clear skies and headed down to Murrells Inlet, South Carolina where we went for a marsh walk, ate barbecue instead of seafood and visited friends. The urban-high rise world of Myrtle Beach is only about 3.5 hours and a complete mind shift away from the beaches and National Forests of the Crystal Coast. While we skipped all the shopping, we had a good time and there was hardly a cloud in the sky for our drive down and back.

We got back and the next day I managed to go for a blue sky boat ride down to Swansboro. I was barely back at the dock when a bit of humidity came back with some clouds. The less than perfect weather has been here for a couple of days.

It is a transitional pattern that often keeps us on our toes during September. Even thunder clouds can rise up and tower over our inlet. Fortunately there is more great weather on the horizon for this third weekend in September and there is supposed to be a reinforcing shot of cool air early next week.

It is not unusual for the weather to change quickly on the coast. I kayaked for two hours on Thursday, September 17 and there was hardly a hint of blue sky. I came in for dinner and barely had time to sit down at the table before a golden sunset framed with blue skies surprised me.

I took it as a sign that the great weather is getting ready to settle into the area. Once it does, we hope to enjoy another great fall on the Crystal Coast. With high temperatures in the low eighties and low temperatures dipping into the fifties and sixties, you will not hear any coastal residents complaining.

With a very wet and warm summer still fresh in our memories, it is easy to welcome some different weather with open arms. That is especially the case because the water temperatures are still in the eighties and the fish have even started biting. Today was only my third or fourth fishing trip in my kayak this summer. Until today, I was only harassed by a few small croakers. Today I got a couple of gulps chewed in half by what I think were small bluefish. I also hooked a small drum and enjoyed a couple of short runs before it threw the hook.

With a little luck the next fishing trip I will bring home a fish for dinner. The great thing about living here in our little bit of coastal paradise is that the weather in the fall is often so nice that you want to bottle it. There are also times when you feel that getting pinched would wake you from a dream of perfect weather.

It is possible to have wonderful evenings on the beach in October and even after Thanksgiving. It is not out of the question to have shorts weather into December.

Beyond just being on the beach in November, it also possible to still do lots of boating even out by what I like to call the big water. When it gets a little chancy out by the ocean, there is always an opportunity to be seduced by the river and enjoy some time kayaking.

It is truly hard to beat the Crystal Coast in the fall. Even the unheated pools can still be enjoyed for another week or so in September. On top of that you will find lots of beautiful scenery to go along with all the beautiful birds and butterflies that grace the area in the fall.

If you have a chance to visit in the fall, you probably will agree that our area is a coastal paradise.

Our most recent email newsletter about our beach area went out Friday, September 4, and can be seen at this link. Our next email newsletter should be out early in October.

If you are interested in visiting the area, check out our free online travel guide to Emerald Isle. If you need more information especially on kayaking and boating, please consider purchasing our five-star rated Emerald Isle book, A Week at the Beach, The Emerald Isle Travel Guide.  The color paperback version is 180 pages of information, maps, and pictures, Prime eligible, and under $25. The Kindle version has exactly the same information for a lot less money.

The Kindle version which works on everything from iPads to smartphones is only $3.99. Later this fall we plan to revise the guide for the fourth time.  All year long we will provide additional information in our newsletter between updates.  Once you buy the Kindle book, you can easily get the updated version each year for no additional cost.

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August Is Not the End Of Beach Season

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August 25, Third Street Beach, Emerald Isle, NC

August 25, Third Street Beach, Emerald Isle, NC

Labor Day weekend is within sight and already many tourists are gone from our beach area. With children back in school, many families have disappeared from our shores.  While it is nice to have smaller crowds on our beaches and in our stores, it is a little sad to see so few people on the beaches just as the best part of the beach season arrives.

While there are never any guarantees with weather other than it can always surprise you, fall on the North Carolina coast is usually a very special time. While many will argue that fall is a season of the mountains, I have to disagree and believe that Fall Belong To The Southern Coast.

I love the beach anytime of the year but much of the summer the beach can be harsh if you want to avoid the heat and the sun that seems to burn a hole right through the ozone. Our summer trips to the beach tend to be late in the evening or early morning if I am fishing. When fall rolls around, mid-day becomes a real possibility.  Even noon can be a very nice time to be at the beach in the fall.

While fall will still bring lots of warm days and more humidity than most of us like, the real heat and humidity start going away around the middle of September. We’re left with warm salt water and pleasant temperatures which often last into November and sometimes even into December.

We have fewer people, generally better weather, and the warm is still warm. It is hard not to like this time of year and then there is always the icing on the cake, the fish usually start biting in the fall and there are some festivals to keep us entertained.

I really enjoy hiking the beaches in the fall. In the spring the cold waters can take some of the pleasantness away from a beach hike but the warm breezes off the water in the fall are just the opposite.

Then there are the local oysters that come in during the fall. Of course the shrimp have had all summer to grow so they are also at their peak.

With still warm sands, water temperatures in the eighties, fewer people, fish biting, and some local seafood at its peak, it is hard to ask for more.

It is also a great time to go boating, the summer thunderstorms start to die down and the area’s waters are perfect for boating or kayaking.

If you have never been to a beach in the fall, you really owe it to yourself to visit during the season that is universally loved by all of us who live here. It just might give you a different perspective on life at the beach.

Our most recent email newsletter about our beach area went out Friday, July 10, and can be seen at this link. Our next email newsletter should be out before Labor Day.

If you are interested in visiting the area, check out our free online travel guide to Emerald Isle. If you need more information especially on kayaking and boating, please consider purchasing our extensive five-star rated Emerald Isle book, A Week at the Beach, The Emerald Isle Travel Guide.

The Kindle version which works on everything from iPads to smartphones is only $3.99. Later in the fall we revise the guide each year and all year long provide additional information in our newsletter between updates.  Once you buy the Kindle book, you can easily get the updated version each year.

Sign-Up for monthly Crystal Coast Life Email Newsletter

Close to Home Crystal Coast Fourth

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Sunset at the Point

Sunset at the Point

For many years quiet Fourth of July celebrations were the rule for our family. We were Americans living in a very rural part of Canada. Fourth of July events would have required a drive across the border into Maine.

Somehow the Fourth has always been about being close to home and Maine was never our home so we stayed in Tay Creek and enjoyed the holiday on our own. The holiday parades of my youth in Lewisville and East Bend, North Carolina, are still alive as memories and I know East Bend continues with the tradition. As with most small town parades, sometimes there are more people in the parade than watching it.

It is not hard to find a Fourth of July event here on the Crystal Coast of North Carolina. The whole world seems to come our way to enjoy the Fourth of July and the towns respond with lots of fireworks. This is no surprise since this happens to be the peak of the beach season.

Peak of the season means we typically have some crowds but not to the degree that you likely would find in more developed areas. Since most of us who live here are spoiled by having the area to ourselves for most of the year, Fourth of July means that most residents tend to stay home during all the traffic and hoopla.

As I started this post on the night of July 4, fireworks were going off all around us. We live three miles up the White Oak River from Swansboro and it seems to be an area tradition for the subdivisions on the river to have some fireworks. This year our subdivision on Raymond’s Gut decided not to have a Fourth of July party. There is so much happening in the area this weekend, it is hard to build enthusiasm for another party.

Sometimes we get creative and try to enjoy the celebrations without getting caught in the crowds. A couple of years ago, a neighbor and I took my boat and his family out on the river to watch the fireworks. It was a nice experience and there was almost no boat traffic but it was not so nice that I have tried to repeat it.

Our first summer here, eight years ago, we actually went over to Emerald Isle and found a side street where we could park and watch the beach fireworks. The normally ten to fifteen minute trip home from the beach took such a long time that we have not attempted watching the island fireworks since then.

As I wrote in an earlier article, “…it is no accident that a local would write a Fourth of July beach article and feature a picture with no beach in sight. The weekend around the Fourth of July is the least likely time for those of us who live here to go over to the beach.” We invited another family in the subdivision to have dinner with us one July 4. They made the mistake of going to the beach that day in Salter Path. A thirty minute return trip turned into three hour journey.

Normally I will at least sneak out on the White Oak in my kayak on July 4, but I just had cataract surgery on my right eye so I am not supposed to get wet or sweat for a while. When I kayak on water that is 84F in almost 90F heat and very high humidity, it is difficult to not instantly sweat. The result is that for 2015 I had to give up my tradition of kayaking on the Fourth.

Summer boating is also very popular here but the weekend of July 4, is not the best time to boat as the boat traffic is very impressive for an area where sometimes I do not even see another boat when I am out in mine. A couple of times I have taken our skiff down the river and into the marshes early on the morning of the Fourth just to see what the traffic looks like.

Boating on the Fourth of July is never as quiet or uncrowded in the harbor and on the Intracoastal as it is the rest of year. This trip which I take regularly is my favorite but I would only try it on July 4, if could I get back to our dock by 8:00 AM.

Even a quick trip to Swansboro like that could also involve getting wet, so this year I just followed the doctor’s orders and just stayed at home and counted my blessings. After all I enjoyed that same boat ride and visited the marshes on Wednesday before July Fourth when there was only a handful of boats around the harbor.

A neighbor who did take his boat over to Bear Island on July 4, 2015, told me that the area was packed with boats. It was also so windy that there was little fun to be found. He confirmed that I did not miss anything by staying home. Holidays are often hypnotic enough to draw sensible people who are trying to escape crowds into a huge crowd.

While our crowds are nothing like they are in many areas, they are a challenge for those of us who moved here for the peace and quiet that is life on the Crystal Coast for ten months out of the year.

Fortunately one of the benefits of living here is that you can easily make the decision that there will be better times to enjoy the area’s beauty than the weekend which draws the most people to our waters each year.

This made me think about how lucky we are to live in a place where people will drive hours and fight considerable traffic and crowds just to spend a week where we get to live all year.

While our visitors barely get to taste life here on the coast, we get to live it to the fullest twelve months of the year. Almost everyone who lives here agrees that the best time is the fall. One neighbor was talking to me the other night. He started out, “Well I sure do not want to wish away our summer weather, but I am certainly looking forward to fall.”

In 2014 we had a wonderful fall. Our falls are so nice that it is not unusual to have weather so nice here on the coast that you wish that you could bottle it. With that in mind, I picked a picture of a sunset on the beach in early September for this post.

Just thinking about being on the beach might help me get beyond the heat and the crowds. I just read an article which said your body cannot tell the difference between visualizing something and actually being there. Of course I do not believe that and will be back on the beach as soon as I get a chance. We have some beaches that touch you each time that you visit and another visit is always just around the corner.

Our most recent newsletter went out the end of May and can be seen at this link. Our next newsletter should be out before the middle of July.

If you are interested in visiting the area, check out our free online travel guide to Emerald Isle. If you need more information, please consider purchasing our extensive Emerald Isle book, A Week at the Beach, The Emerald Isle Travel Guide. The Kindle version which works on everything from iPads to smartphones is only $3.99. We update it each year and I always provide instructions on how to get the annual update in our newsletter.

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Warm Coastal Winds

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Warm winds & oyster rock on the White Oak River

Warm winds & oyster rock on the White Oak River

The weather has been as hot as it ever gets here on the Southern Outer Banks. I am thankful the warm weather has come with warm breezes.

Some might say that summer has embraced us with a vengeance. I would probably say that mother nature has given us several real Southern days and we should enjoy them as best as we can because summer will be gone far too soon.

It is not unusual for it to get hot here along Carteret County’s Crystal Coast. It is a Southern coastal plain and cool summer weather is pretty rare. Thunderstorms are much more common and often even welcome. This much warm weather coming this early in June just adds more mystery to the riddle of coastal weather. There is little sense in trying to understand our weather since it is going to change before we figure it out anyway.

Complaining about the heat after a cold winter just seems wrong. I moved to the coast for warmth not cool summers. I am just pleased that we have received more than enough moisture to keep our yards and gardens from cooking. It has been great weather for growing tomatoes and beans. The hot weather and great vegetables have helped us prepare some classic Southern meals for our table. The local corn, our homegrown beans and tomatoes have let us feast like true Southerners.

One of the things which happens when it gets very warm is that most of our outdoor time is either very early or very late in the day. Those are my favorite times of day anyway.  The light is at its best for landscape photography. The middle of the day is often too humid to survive unless you are in some cool water which get hard to find as summer rolls along.

Being outside at night when a warm wind is blowing brings back lots of wonderful summer memories. My mother used to pack as many of her nieces as possible into her old Ford and head to the beach for a couple of weeks each summer. I course was packed in there with her teenage nieces who were around ten years older than me. We never stayed in any place fancy but the evenings along the boardwalk were especially magical in those days before television.

There always seemed to be a warm breeze with music floating on it. While it is rare that I hear music in the evening in our quiet subdivision nestled between corn fields, pine forests, the river, and a golf course, I do often feel the warm breeze and smell the ocean.  A recent night when it was still 80F at 9PM with a 15-20 MPH breeze found us at the neighborhood pool.  The only light came from the stars, moon and the underwater lights in the pool. It was one of those magical nights that grandparents get to have along the Crystal Coast.  Our almost seven year old granddaughter swam like a dolphin while her younger brother dipped his toes into pool water for the first time.

The warmth coming off the water is welcome most of the year. I might get tired of it by August, but in June I can still remember the cold of winter and appreciate the warmth of summer.

The breezes are even nicer when you get to enjoy them from a boat out on the White Oak River. Being on the river on a warm summer night and tasting the salt air on the breeze is almost as good as walking under the moonlight on a beach with the salt water touching your toes.

All that is more is possible here on the Crystal Coast where we never make our shrimp and grits with anything but local shrimp and a warm coastal breeze is possible almost anytime of the day or night.  While warm breezes that make you feel like you are at the beach are common, late evening thunderstorms are even more common. We have seen some amazing storms recently and our June rain total is up to 7.4 inches with a week still to go.

If you are already here and need a little more information about our piece of paradise, this link is a good starting point and subscribing to our newsletter is a great next step that will keep you up to date with what is happening in the area that stretches from Swansboro through Morehead  City, Beaufort and Down East up to Cedar Island.

Our most recent newsletter went out the end of May and can be seen at this link. Our next newsletter should be out by the end of June.

If you are interested in visiting the area, check out our free online travel guide to Emerald Isle. If you need more information, please consider purchasing our extensive Emerald Isle book, A Week at the Beach, The Emerald Isle Travel Guide. The Kindle version which works on everything from iPads to smartphones is only $3.99. We update it each year and I always provide instructions on how to get the annual update in our newsletter.

Sign-Up for monthly Crystal Coast Life Email Newsletter