Bewitching Spring Memories

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beachday4wm

Spring thoughts can have many different triggers that often depend on where you live. In the north country, our home for many years, spring was the magical moment when all the snow disappeared and the grass turned green and started growing.

Spring in the Shenandoah Valley that stretches from West Virginia to Roanoake, Virginia is a time of beautiful blooming trees from redbuds to dogwoods.  Spring in the Piedmont of North Carolina is an explosion of growth from daffodils and tulips to azaleas and rhododendrons. You can chase spring and blooming bushes from the foothills to the spine of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

A coastal Carolina spring is more of a tease. While many years like this year we are spared the worst of winter, we also are haunted by winds blowing in across the area’s extensive waters. Sometimes it gives us a drawn out spring and only teases us with real warmth. Then there are years like 2012 when we are wading in the ocean water in March. This year turned cool in early April and we even had a light frost on April 6, 2016. It was the first April frost we have seen in our almost ten years on the Crystal Coast. Just to make sure we got the message, we came close to another frost on Sunday, April 10.

Since then our temperatures have been in the low to mid sixties which would delight most people. However, our low temperatures have been in the mid-forties. We had an eighty degree day on March 28, but in the fourteen days since April 1, there have only been three days that have touched seventy degrees. Our average high this time of year is seventy and our average low is fifty-five Fahrenheit so the first part of April has been cool and very windy compared to the averages.

The winds are not so unusual but right now cool temperatures reinforced by steady winds means that we are living on spring memories. Usually by this time of year, I have been out in our skiff a number of times and even enjoyed kayaking a few times. The call of the river is powerful for those of us who live close by the water but it is not enough to overcome cold water and persistent winds. I have managed one kayaking trip back during our warm spell on March 12. Since then both the skiff and the kayak have been at the dock.

My other spring passion is hiking along the beaches. I managed one trip where I hiked the Point back on March 11, but it has just been a little cool and windy for my regular hikes on the beach. I stopped by Third Street Beach the other day and there was no one on the beach as far as I could see in either direction.

The cool weather is not all bad, the flowers are lasting longer and it has been a great season to grow lettuce and broccoli. Still I would rather be out on the beach or the water and Mother Nature just has not cooperated very much since March. I continue to cling to my uniform of crocs, shorts and t-shirt, but I have been forced to don a sweat shirt for my morning and evening walks.

There is never a question as to whether it will get warmer or not in Eastern North Carolina. The question is whether we will get to enjoy that happy medium between too warm and too cold before it does get too hot. In March we kept the windows shut to keep out the pine pollen. The pine pollen has disappeared by mid-April but only in the sunny afternoon is it safe to open the windows a little. Even worse the heat pump comes on just before I get up in the morning.

I am grateful that we have had something of a dry spell. After last years unbelievable rains, it is nice to have a chance to walk on our yards without them feeling like sponges. Spring warmth will get here and our cool waters will keep it from being a Washington, DC spring where you go from spring to summer in a week. The wait is just a little longer than normal.

It is time to make vacation plans for this summer’s trip to the beach.  Do not forget our travel guide. The Kindle version is $3.99.  Purchasers of the Kindle version can get a free update to 2016 version when we publish in May.  Amazon has the full color, 180 plus page 2014 paperback version for $24.95 and it is prime eligible.

Our target date for the new 2016 versions now is early May.  My day job has been kept me from writing as much as I would like, but I do not give up easily.

Our next email newsletter should be out in late April.

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The Winds of March

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bouguesoundwm

It is the time of the year when the winds rule North Carolina’s coastal counties including where I live along the Crystal Coast.

The winds that we get in March and April are no surprise. In fact it would be much more surprising if there were no winds in spring. The bigger the temperature differential between the water and the land, the stronger our daily dose of wind will be.

The land warms more easily than the water. That means as the air over land warms it rises. Conversely the air over the water cools and falls towards the surface of the water. Of course the rising air over the lands sucks the falling air over the water towards the land.  It is like a conveyor belt for wind. The conveyor belt reverses at night and the winds go towards the water.  When the water and land have greatly different temperatures, the effect is magnified and we have strong winds.

Understanding the scientific reason for our winds does not make the river any less choppy. I have taken a couple of new-to-our-area boaters down the river recently. Because I went out on the river at 10:30 AM and came back around 1 PM, I can testify to the midday warmth having a great impact on the winds on the White Oak River. The river became noticeably more choppy the closer we got to noon as the air temperature warmed. Very early in the morning, the river was much calmer.

In spite of the winds, it was nice on the river, but those of us who love the water will say that even when we have almost frozen our fingers off.  Thankfully this early March trip required no gloves.  I managed to survive in shorts and short-sleeved tee shirt. I am glad that I stayed out of the water since it was still a bone-chilling 54F.

As much as I love the water, I will not put myself as risk by kayaking in 54F water. The enticing look of the water has little to do with its temperature. Besides the ride in a kayak in water as choppy as we had today can be damp and pretty challenging. The wind has been blowing straight into our inlet during daylight for the last two or three days. Just the paddling against the wind would wear you down. There will be plenty of calm mornings for kayaking. I will never forget one early spring day when I moved out of the channel to let a neighbor by with his skiff.  The wind was really challenging me  and he offered to throw me a rope and tow me out to the river.  I declined mostly because I knew if I was working very hard going out, the trip back in would be an easy ride with the breeze at my back.

The wind does not just slow down the beginning of boating season, it also can make walking on the beach a good way to exfoliate some of the skin on our ankles.  When the wind is up to 15 MPH it tempers my desire to go for a long hike over the Point on Emerald Isle.  As you can see from this YouTube video, the blowing sand at the Point can be formidable.

Back when I was newbie to gardening on the Crystal Coast, I remember having to buy bales of pine straw to protect my tender tomato plants from the wind.  I have gotten better at growing strong tomato plants but the wind never diminishes for very long until summer when the temperatures between land and sea equalize.  The wind is not all bad.  It keep us cooler when summer comes early to North Carolina’s coastal plain.  We get to turn off our heat pumps and enjoy open windows until the pine pollen explodes.

Wind, low water, and cooler temperatures than what our inland brethren enjoy are all part of the signatures of spring here on the coast as we ride the temperature curve to summer.

Our most recent email newsletter, Happy New Year from the Coast, was published on December 31.  The previous one, Changing Coastal Seasons, was sent out on October 29. Our next email newsletter should be out in late April

It will not be long before it is time to make vacation plans for this summer’s trip to the beach.  Do not forget our travel guide. The Kindle version is $3.99 and Amazon has the full color, 180 plus page paperback version for $24.95.

Updates to our travel guide are coming. Our target date for the new 2016 versions is the end of March.

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Glassy Water Dreams

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A Calm Day on the White Oak River

A Calm Day on the White Oak River

February can be a teaser of a month and sometimes a very cruel mistress for those of us in love with the water. It is hard to say where February 2016 falls in that scale, but it has not been one of those months when it is easy to fantasize that our waters are ready for boating.

Whatever warmth we have enjoyed has been more than balanced by cold temperatures and rain which almost make spring seem like a fantasy. On the Crystal Coast by this time of year, winter is usually on the run. At least this year, we have gotten through the winter without Raymond’s Gut being completely iced over like we were in January 2014. I also did not have to use my skiff as an ice breaker like I have in the past.

I was disappointed when I dropped my skiff in the water for a late winter test this last week of February. I found the water temperature a cool 49.8F. While it could have been colder, the fisherman, boater, and kayaker in me was hoping for warmer water. It is one of the challenges of this time of year. The water looks enticing but it can be dangerously cold. Between the cold water and the shallow tides of early spring, reality sets in quickly for most of us boaters in the spring. It only takes a few minutes on the river to remind you that even if the air temperature on land is 65F, the air just above that 49.8F water will be pretty close to 50F and that is without the breeze from running down the river at 30MPH.

Beautiful sunsets like the one I used in this post help but as much as I like sunsets, I would rather be dreaming of warm water. Certainly our February marsh diversions are far better than a blizzard or storm up north.  Still time on the water is so close that we can taste it and it almost hurts.

With the water and weather teasing us we have to enjoy what we have which includes a fair number of winter visitors to the marsh. That means otters and our standard fare of great blue herons, great egrets, kingfishers, pelicans, cormorants, grebes and even some random ducks that have escaped to live another day.

While sneaking up on ducks is good entertainment, it is easy to confess that I really want warm temperatures that stay around long enough to start that sometimes long spring process of warming our waters. I say long process but often the waters here warm quickly. That is especially true in our shallow, dark-bottomed marsh which can sometimes warm very fast once we get to March. I have joked about charging for the warmer marsh waters that we send down the river.

Even with our still cold water, our soil which has had something of break from the intense rainfall of January and early February (over thirteen inches) has warmed enough to allow planting of lettuce, onion sets, spinach, and other other cool weather crops.

It is a good start towards spring and I will soon start thinking about a late winter hike over on the Point to see what changes winter has brought. Usually a hike on the beach will make me remember that it does matter where you live and the place where I live lets me say that I am living my dream here in a Coastal Paradise.

Our most recent email newsletter, Happy New Year from the Coast, was published on December 31.  The previous one, Changing Coastal Seasons, was sent out on October 29. Our next email newsletter should be out in March.

Vacation plans for this summer’s trip to the beach should be on the horizon.  Do not forget our travel guide. The Kindle version is $3.99 and Amazon has the full color, 180 plus page paperback version for $24.95.

Updates to our travel guide are coming. Our target date for the new 2016 versions is the April.  New versions are always free to Kindle purchasers and Kindle books work on anything including iPads and iPhones.

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Winter in the Cove

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Raymond's Gut, January 9, 2016

Raymond’s Gut, January 9, 2016

It is a little strange to think about winter when the temperature is hovering around 67F on January 10, 2016. However, I know better than to pretend that winter will not find us. We all know that the good run of warm weather this year has to end sometime.

As hard as it is to believe, we are still getting a few cherry tomatoes from our garden and some sugar snap peas. I managed to cover the last tomato plant and protect it from the one short spell of cold air that found our cozy spot near the White Oak River. The sugar snap peas made it through without any help like some of our petunias and roses that are still blooming.

It is not unusual to have some nice January weather on the North Carolina coast. We generally get pretty spoiled and complain about how miserable we are if we get some cold days. Our cold days get us little sympathy from our New England and Canadian friends. I almost hesitate to say it, but we consider it a cold day if we do not make it to fifty degrees Fahrenheit.

I can appreciate their feelings since I have endured my fair share of winter weather on a mountain near Roanoke, Virginia and in the heart of a snow belt north of Fredericton, New Brunswick in Canada. Winter is a totally different beast in Canada than it is on the Southern Outer Banks.

While the days and weeks before winter in Canada are usually a mad rush to get everything done before a deep snow suspends daily activities, waiting for winter to come is usually an exciting time on the coast. The months before winter are some of the best on the Carolina coast. We fish, boat, and hike the beaches. There are no crowds, the humidity is gone and the water is often still warm. This winter I saw people in the surf in early December and my daughter and I took a holiday ride down the river after Christmas. I wore shorts and a t-shirt.

Even if the winter turns harsh we will likely only have six or seven weeks weeks of cold weather left.  While it is possible that Raymond’s Gut could freeze over like it did in 2014, it is more likely that we will stay on the weather roller coaster to spring.  That will give us brief periods of cold weather broken up by short spells of ever warming weather as the North Carolina winter sunshine gets its strength back.

Wintering here on the coast can give you a little climatic whiplash, but I would rather have it that way than continual cold or no cold at all. A little taste of winter is fine. However, I did not move to the beach for snow so I am always happy to get to that time in February when I can say that winter’s back is broken.

Maybe I had too many long walks to the barn in the winter to have any desire for yet another snowstorm. The first winter we lived in Tay Creek back in the early seventies, we recorded twenty-three feet of snow. That year the snow came before November 1, and stayed on the ground well into May. On top of that we had just moved from Nova Scotia where my wife had gotten more than a taste of a September snow just after we got married the previous year.

Winter is not so bad at the coast and even now I can almost taste spring. Once again our Canadian great egret friend, Frank 29X, seems to have decided to spend some of the winter with us. Actually he has been in our inlet, Raymond’s Gut, since December 29.  He was behind our home on January 8 and came back to gobble up some fish from the marsh behind our house as we had our lunch on January 9.   The truth is that I would rather have a Canadian great egret as company than a Canadian winter.

Our most recent email newsletter, Happy New Year from the Coast, was published on December 31.  The previous one, Changing Coastal Seasons, was sent out on October 29. Our next email newsletter should be out in February.

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A November to Remember

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Last Sunday in November Beach Crowd

Last Sunday in November Beach Crowd

There are perhaps a number of reasons to remember this past November. One of the most poignant for me is that this is the first month in the last eleven years that I did not have the time to write a single post for the web.

I did find a few times when I could enjoy the Crystal Coast with my skiff, kayak, and through the camera on my son’s drone. Even with the challenges that have kept me mostly off the water, it has been a wonderful month.

Looking back a year, it is hard to believe how different the weather has been in 2015. Last year I was writing about unusual cold. That November was memorable mostly for how cold it got.

This year it is hard to write about our weather without mentioning the unusually heavy precipitation that has fallen since June 1, 2015. Currently our rainfall total since then stands at 59.40 inches. In just a few hours on the afternoon of November 19, we received 7.1 inches of rain. That downpour of rain is typical of some of the storms we have seen this summer except it was even more intense. Over six inches fell in just three hours. We had a sheet of water four inches deep flowing down our street.

With all the rain, fishing in the White Oak River has not been a way to get fish into the pan. While the water temperature was holding at sixty degree Fahrenheit the last weekend in November, it will likely drop into the fifties by the first weekend of December. That is hard to believe given that our high temperature on December 2 was 77F. However, high temperatures after Wednesday when we saw the 77F are not going to get out the fifties until the weekend. Low temperatures are also going to dip into the upper thirties. The river water will get colder fast. The last hope for fish might be finding some trout. Last weekend I tried the river and found no trout in the usual places but I remain hopeful.

Still it was stunningly beautiful out on the river in my kayak. I was even lucky enough to paddle by a couple of otters swimming in golden water. Fortunately November has been a great month for gardening. We only had one frost and were able to protect our tomatoes and lettuce from any damage. Our buttercrunch lettuce crop has been the best ever and we finished our fall 2015 harvest of green beans on November 23 just before the one frost that found us. We are starting to get a few tomatoes. A December tomato is a rarity even here on the North Carolina coast.

November is special for photographers because the area’s waters have a habit of turning golden during the month. It seems to be a regular occurrence and I enjoy capturing the spectacular scenes like the ones with the otters. Even more fun has been seeing the area through the lens of my son’s drone. Last year he was down for a few days and only experimented a little during that Christmas.

Mostly those shots got me excited for his next trip.  Seeing our area from 100 to 250 above the ground is not something that is easy to do in our land of no hills. Fortunately the drone and pilot were here for a week this Thanksgiving.  It gave us time for a major effort to photograph some of my favorite spots. He got some great shots of the White Oak, Raymond’s Gut, the Point, and even Bogue Sound. He also did a panoramic movie of the Point.

While I did not have as much leisure time as I would have liked this past month, it is hard to complain when there is plenty of great weather and I have enjoyed some of it from the kayak and on the beach. The picture at the top of the post was taken from Bogue Inlet Pier on Sunday, November 29. It looks like I was not the only person enjoying November. There were a number of surfers on the other side of the pier.

It has been another great fall and you can read about our equally nice but wet summer at my SOBX Coastal Paradise site.  Early fall is covered in this post.

Our most recent email newsletter, Changing Coastal Seasons, went out on October 29. The previous one, Still in Summer’s Embrace, can be seen at this link. Our next email newsletter should be out sometime in early December.

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Cue The Great Weather

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Swansboro Harbor

Swansboro Harbor

We are just past the middle of September and already the worst of the heat of summer has disappeared. We have recently enjoyed some of the nicest weather since spring and the beach has been stunning.

However, coastal weather is tricky and even great weather can be a tease. We had a few perfect days early in the week of September 14. We took advantage of the clear skies and headed down to Murrells Inlet, South Carolina where we went for a marsh walk, ate barbecue instead of seafood and visited friends. The urban-high rise world of Myrtle Beach is only about 3.5 hours and a complete mind shift away from the beaches and National Forests of the Crystal Coast. While we skipped all the shopping, we had a good time and there was hardly a cloud in the sky for our drive down and back.

We got back and the next day I managed to go for a blue sky boat ride down to Swansboro. I was barely back at the dock when a bit of humidity came back with some clouds. The less than perfect weather has been here for a couple of days.

It is a transitional pattern that often keeps us on our toes during September. Even thunder clouds can rise up and tower over our inlet. Fortunately there is more great weather on the horizon for this third weekend in September and there is supposed to be a reinforcing shot of cool air early next week.

It is not unusual for the weather to change quickly on the coast. I kayaked for two hours on Thursday, September 17 and there was hardly a hint of blue sky. I came in for dinner and barely had time to sit down at the table before a golden sunset framed with blue skies surprised me.

I took it as a sign that the great weather is getting ready to settle into the area. Once it does, we hope to enjoy another great fall on the Crystal Coast. With high temperatures in the low eighties and low temperatures dipping into the fifties and sixties, you will not hear any coastal residents complaining.

With a very wet and warm summer still fresh in our memories, it is easy to welcome some different weather with open arms. That is especially the case because the water temperatures are still in the eighties and the fish have even started biting. Today was only my third or fourth fishing trip in my kayak this summer. Until today, I was only harassed by a few small croakers. Today I got a couple of gulps chewed in half by what I think were small bluefish. I also hooked a small drum and enjoyed a couple of short runs before it threw the hook.

With a little luck the next fishing trip I will bring home a fish for dinner. The great thing about living here in our little bit of coastal paradise is that the weather in the fall is often so nice that you want to bottle it. There are also times when you feel that getting pinched would wake you from a dream of perfect weather.

It is possible to have wonderful evenings on the beach in October and even after Thanksgiving. It is not out of the question to have shorts weather into December.

Beyond just being on the beach in November, it also possible to still do lots of boating even out by what I like to call the big water. When it gets a little chancy out by the ocean, there is always an opportunity to be seduced by the river and enjoy some time kayaking.

It is truly hard to beat the Crystal Coast in the fall. Even the unheated pools can still be enjoyed for another week or so in September. On top of that you will find lots of beautiful scenery to go along with all the beautiful birds and butterflies that grace the area in the fall.

If you have a chance to visit in the fall, you probably will agree that our area is a coastal paradise.

Our most recent email newsletter about our beach area went out Friday, September 4, and can be seen at this link. Our next email newsletter should be out early in October.

If you are interested in visiting the area, check out our free online travel guide to Emerald Isle. If you need more information especially on kayaking and boating, please consider purchasing our five-star rated Emerald Isle book, A Week at the Beach, The Emerald Isle Travel Guide.  The color paperback version is 180 pages of information, maps, and pictures, Prime eligible, and under $25. The Kindle version has exactly the same information for a lot less money.

The Kindle version which works on everything from iPads to smartphones is only $3.99. Later this fall we plan to revise the guide for the fourth time.  All year long we will provide additional information in our newsletter between updates.  Once you buy the Kindle book, you can easily get the updated version each year for no additional cost.

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